Topic : Extractive industries

The evolving role of CSR in international development: Evidence from Canadian extractive companies’ involvement in community health initiatives in low-income countries

Overseas development agencies and international finance organisations view the exploitation of minerals as a strategy for alleviating poverty in low-income countries. However, for local communities that are directly affected by extractive industry projects, economic and social benefits often fail to materialise. By engaging in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), transnational companies operating in the extractive industries ‘space’ verbally commit to preventing environmental impacts and providing health services in low-income countries.

Read more about The evolving role of CSR in international development: Evidence from Canadian extractive companies’ involvement in community health initiatives in low-income countries

Understanding Power Relationships: Commentary on Wurr C and Cooney L (2014) 'Ethical Dilemmas in Population-Level Treatment of Lead Poisoning in Zamfara State, Nigeria'

After 4 years of relief activities, it is difficult to keep managing the lead poisoning epidemic in northern Nigeria as an emergency situation, while it appears clearly to be a more complex, widespread and chronic public health issue than anticipated. Making the continuing treatment of children conditional upon commitments from impacted families to adhere to safe mining practices is unlikely to bring about any long-term benefit. This is because such commitment is ultimately not in the hands of the victims or their families.

Read more about Understanding Power Relationships: Commentary on Wurr C and Cooney L (2014) 'Ethical Dilemmas in Population-Level Treatment of Lead Poisoning in Zamfara State, Nigeria'

The interaction between humanitarian non-governmental organisations and extractive industries: a perspective from Médecins Sans Frontières

This opinion note explores some aspects of the relationship between humanitarian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and extractive industries. Médecins sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders, MSF) has endorsed a policy of non-engagement with the corporate sector of the extractive industries, particularly when it comes to financial donations.
Read more about The interaction between humanitarian non-governmental organisations and extractive industries: a perspective from Médecins Sans Frontières

What Is the Relationship of Medical Humanitarian Organisations with Mining and Other Extractive Industries?

In developing countries, extractive industries have far reaching consequences on health through environmental pollution, some communicable diseases, violence, destitution, and compromised food security. The rapid expansion of extractive industries and the increasing frequency of environmental disasters are bound to engage medical humanitarian organisations in developing novel types of expertise.

Read more about What Is the Relationship of Medical Humanitarian Organisations with Mining and Other Extractive Industries?